University of 51׻ʻi System News /news News from the University of 51׻i Tue, 18 Jun 2024 20:02:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 /news/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/cropped-UHNews512-1-32x32.jpg University of 51׻ʻi System News /news 32 32 28449828 NVIDIA visits UH Esports to talk jobs; new scholarships for students /news/2024/06/18/nvidia-visits-uh-esports/ Tue, 18 Jun 2024 20:02:06 +0000 /news/?p=199491 NVIDIA’s emphasis on hiring gamers was a real eye opener to the UH ԴDz students.

The post NVIDIA visits UH Esports to talk jobs; new scholarships for students first appeared on University of 51׻ʻi System News.]]>
Reading time: 2 minutes

people standing and smiling

In less than five years since its inception, the University of 51׻ʻi at ԴDz esports program has achieved global prominence, winning national collegiate program of the year in 2022, ranking in the top 5 nationally in multiple games and placing several students in successful international esports internships and jobs. Due to the program’s success, attention from tech and esports companies around the world continues to build.

In the spring 2024 semester, four employees from the world’s most valuable company NVIDIA—a leading technology organization specializing in graphics processing units for gaming, professional visualization, data centers and automotive markets—visited UH ԴDz to talk with students about future career opportunities with the company. Students asked questions about careers related to gaming and artificial intelligence, and exchanged contact information with the NVIDIA representatives. NVIDIA’s emphasis on hiring gamers was a real eye opener to the UH ԴDz students.

Kyle Yumen, NVIDIA director of test engineering, said the visit was “Refreshing to see the dedication these students are putting into their education and gaming. They’ve built a great supportive community and friends.”

UH Esports (UHE) is constantly looking for opportunities for students to interface with the broader video games industry,” said Nyle Sky Kauweloa, UH Esports program director. “A visit by NVIDIA highlights UHE‘s commitment to that goal, and the success we’ve had in standing out as a program. What also made this visit special is that the engineers at NVIDIA specifically came to UHE looking for gamers and esports players to network with and possibly hire for future jobs. At the end of the talk, they even asked the students to prepare a ‘gaming resume’ if they were interested in working at NVIDIA’s AI gaming division.”

Aloha Pacific FCU extends student scholarships

The UH ԴDz esports program has received a donation of more than $26,000 from Aloha Pacific Federal Credit Union for the second straight year, extending the team’s first scholarship fund. Scholarships are awarded each fall to the five students who qualify for the fall varsity Overwatch team. Each scholarship is worth $2,000. With the additional funding, Kauweloa hopes to expand scholarships to students on the other teams.

UH Esports receives funding from the . Visit the UH Esports team’s and . More stories on UH’s esports program.

The post NVIDIA visits UH Esports to talk jobs; new scholarships for students first appeared on University of 51׻ʻi System News.]]>
199491
Record $5M for 51׻ʻi Promise scholarships at UH Community Colleges /news/2024/06/18/record-5m-for-hawaii-promise-scholarships/ Tue, 18 Jun 2024 18:00:14 +0000 /news/?p=199460 More funds are available to help eligible UH Community College students with tuition, fees, books and supplies.

The post Record $5M for 51׻ʻi Promise scholarships at UH Community Colleges first appeared on University of 51׻ʻi System News.]]>
Reading time: 2 minutes

student in graduation attire with $5M 51׻i Promise Scholarship graphic

Higher education is now more accessible and affordable for all prospective and current University of 51׻ʻi Community College students.

UH and the State of 51׻ʻi have committed $5 million this year for the , the most ever. Enrolled students who are 51׻ʻi residents are eligible for consideration.

Alena Fontaine
Alena Fontaine

The funds will help to cover direct education costs not met by other forms of financial aid, including tuition, fees and an allowance for books and supplies.

“The 51׻ʻi Promise scholarship has allowed me to work towards completing my degree at a part-time status so I can still work full-time without the burden of extra tuition and book costs,” said student Alena Fontaine.

student Christina Faye said, “After losing my home along with my hometown in the Lahaina wildfire, the 51׻ʻi Promise Scholarship has helped me get back on my feet by supporting me financially and not having me worry too much about spending my whole paychecks on my tuition.”

Christina Faye
Christina Faye, UH Maui College student

To be considered for 51׻ʻi Promise, students must complete the . For the upcoming fall semester, students should complete the FAFSA by July 1.

For free help in completing the FAFSA, email FAFSA@hawaii.edu or call the FAFSA Hotline at (808) 842-2540, Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

“We are committed to making higher education accessible for all,” said Erika Lacro, vice president for the . “The 51׻ʻi Promise Scholarship is our promise to 51׻ʻi residents that cost should not be a barrier to attend our seven amazing community college campuses. We hope this scholarship will open more doors to unlimited opportunities and empower individuals to achieve their academic and career goals.”

More on the 51׻ʻi Promise Scholarship

The UH Community Colleges continue to be one of the most affordable higher education options in the nation. In 2023–24, the average tuition and fees for public two-year colleges was $3,990, according to the American Association of Community Colleges, compared to a $3,200 for a UH Community College.

Helping hundreds of 51׻ʻi students

Desiree Fleming
Desiree Fleming

In fiscal year 2023, $3.8 million in 51׻ʻi Promise Scholarship funds were awarded to 1,774 eligible students across the seven UH Community Colleges. The average award per student was $2,142.

Since its inception in 2017, the 51׻ʻi Promise scholarship has served more than 8,600 UH students.

“Being an older student and starting the path to my dream endeavor, was ONLY made possible by the 51׻ʻi Promise Scholarship,” said Desiree Fleming, a Kapiʻolani CC student. “Had I known I could have qualified or have this kind of financial support toward my dream, I most certainly would have entered college sooner. I can now say that I’m a college student even at my age. I am so very thankful and blessed to have received such a gift of support!”

Michael Amado
Michael Amado

“The 51׻ʻi Promise Scholarship was incredibly helpful for me in continuing my college education and transferring from Kapiolani CC to UH ԴDz,” said Michael Amado, a former Kapiʻolani CC student. “The scholarship not only helped with living expenses but also allowed me not to have to work as many hours so I could devote more time to my studies. …the 51׻ʻi Promise Scholarship is a shining light for students who want a better future for themselves and their families.”

For more information on eligibility and how to apply for the 51׻ʻi Promise Scholarship, visit .

By Lesli Yogi

The post Record $5M for 51׻ʻi Promise scholarships at UH Community Colleges first appeared on University of 51׻ʻi System News.]]>
199460
Bachman Hall renovation modernized structure while preserving historic past /news/2024/06/17/bachman-hall-renovation-modernized-preserved-historic-past/ Tue, 18 Jun 2024 02:41:27 +0000 /news/?p=199466 The project preserves the original architectural style of the lobby and building exterior.

The post Bachman Hall renovation modernized structure while preserving historic past first appeared on University of 51׻ʻi System News.]]>
Reading time: 3 minutes

Bachman hall exterior nightA three-year, $26 million dollar renovation of Bachman Hall, one of the iconic buildings on the University of 51׻ʻi at ԴDz campus, was completed in February 2024. Built in 1949, the two-story, 26,330 square-foot historic structure is located on UH ԴDz’s most visible corner, the intersection of University Avenue and Dole Street, next to the John Henry Wise Field. Bachman Hall is known for being designed by renowned 51׻ʻi architect Vladimir Ossipoff, two lobby murals painted by artist Jean Charlot in the 1950s, and as a student protest site over the decades, including demonstrations opposing the Vietnam War and proposed Thirty Meter Telescope on Maunakea.

People sitting in a conference room“The Office of Project Delivery has done yet another outstanding job,” said UH President David Lassner. “This renovation not only addresses the health concerns that had developed over the last decades but also modernizes the building for current needs, while preserving its historic past. In some cases, restoring the original look as designed. Bachman Hall is now ready to serve the university for many more decades.”

Originally called the Administration Building when it opened, Bachman Hall continues to house administrative offices, including those of the UH president, vice presidents, and the Board of Regents (BOR).

President Lassner in his officeThe renovation project was comprehensive, addressing damage in multiple locations caused by roof leaks that originated from air conditioning duct installations in the 1970s. The roof has been replaced, and a new energy-efficient AC system has been installed within the building. The interior was completely gutted and now features modern, flexible office spaces for 65 people and six large conference rooms, including a 2,500-square-foot room dedicated for BOR public meetings that can accommodate up to 160 people.

Bachman interior, Charlot muralsThe project preserves the original architectural style of the lobby and building exterior. Terrazzo flooring, known for its durability, was installed in the two-story lobby, and the Charlot murals now feature new art lighting. The jalousie windows put in years after the Bachman Hall was first constructed have been replaced with energy-efficient double-pane windows with operable awnings that closely resemble the building’s original windows. There is also new lighting for the exterior of the building that makes the iconic building stand out at night.

“Bachman Hall is such a beautifully designed building, and it was a priority to keep that historic look and feel,” said UH Vice President Jan Gouveia. “What I am most excited about is that the board will be holding its public meetings there so members of our community and the public can also enjoy the newly renovated building.”

Another UH Design-Build project

Isabella Abbott and Life Sciences BuildingThe Office of Project Delivery, under the UH Office of the Vice President for Administration, oversaw this Design-Build renovation project. Compared to the typical design-bid-build process, a Design-Build project has a single contract for the design and construction with a fixed cost, which increases its likelihood of completion on time and with fewer cost overruns.

Other UH Design-Build projects include the Isabella Aiona Abbott Life Sciences Building, also on the UH ԴDz campus, and the Academy for Creative Media facility at UH West Oʻahu.

More Bachman Hall facts

Black and white image of BachmanThe building was officially named after Paul Bachman, the universityʻs fifth president, at UH‘s 50th anniversary celebration on March 25, 1957. Bachman had died unexpectedly just a few months earlier at the age of 55 after serving for just 16 months.

Bachman Hall had three walk-in safes made of steel and concrete that were demolished during the renovation project. The safes were used to store cash from students who paid their tuition at transaction windows by the courtyard.

The elevated planter to the right of the flag pole was originally designed as a reflecting pond, and the grass area in front of the building was originally planned as a driveway and parking area.

The last major construction projects at Bachman Hall were in 2001, when the building was brought up to building code, and a fire alarm system was installed, and in 1981, when termite damage was repaired.

The post Bachman Hall renovation modernized structure while preserving historic past first appeared on University of 51׻ʻi System News.]]>
199466
A grandfather’s journey to medical school /news/2024/06/17/grandfathers-journey-to-med-school/ Tue, 18 Jun 2024 00:50:03 +0000 /news/?p=199420 At 49, Tony Head is embarking on a new chapter in his life—his first year at JABSOM.

The post A grandfather’s journey to medical school first appeared on University of 51׻ʻi System News.]]>
Reading time: 2 minutes
head family
Tony Head, right, with his wife, far left, and children.

Tony Head’s journey to becoming a medical student at the University of 51׻ʻi at ԴDz’s (JABSOM) began long before many of his peers were born. At 49, the new grandfather and father of four adult children is embarking on a new chapter in his life—his first year at JABSOM.

While Head just began his medical school journey, his youngest son, born in 2002, recently graduated from UH ԴDz. Head became a grandfather in June 2023.

“Trying to juggle everything was a bit of a challenge, but I guess the best part of that story is that I’m still here. I didn’t fail any of my exams, and I’m still working through the course material.”

Academic aspirations

Head enrolled at in 2000, earning a liberal arts degree in 2008. Despite the struggles, he never gave up on his academic aspirations.

“When I started college, I couldn’t drop everything and focus on school, so it just took a long time for me to get where I am,” he said.

When I started college, I couldn’t drop everything and focus on school, so it just took a long time for me to get where I am.
—Tony Head

The turning point in Head’s academic career came during his first year at Leeward CC when his mother passed away from cancer. Her treatment for myelodysplastic syndrome and subsequent brain hemorrhage during a platelet transfusion deeply impacted him.

“That was probably the biggest influence in terms of pursuing research,” Head said. After a brief hiatus, Head entered UH ԴDz in 2013, majoring in molecular biology. His mother’s passing fueled his passion for research, pushing him to seek answers to cell-based questions. He graduated in 2018, completed a master’s program by 2022, and then applied to JABSOM—all while managing a growing family.

“Part of the decision to kind of go to school part-time instead of full-time was to dedicate myself to being a good parent, father and husband at home,” he said.

Inspiring his children

head family early years
The Head Family in their early years.

Reflecting on parenthood, he noted that early years were easier with help from his wife’s parents, but as his children grew older, guiding them became more complex.

“Psychologically and socially, there’s a lot more going on as they get older, too,” he explained.

This Father’s Day was especially significant for Head, but he knows it didn’t come without hardships. Head’s father-in-law passed away in the Philippines, and he lost family members in the tragic Maui wildfires. Through it all, he persevered, and his children have noticed.

“I hope that inspires my children to want to do well for themselves. I hope that if they get anything out of what they see in me, they should keep going and pursue the thing they love in life and never quit,” he said.

.

The post A grandfather’s journey to medical school first appeared on University of 51׻ʻi System News.]]>
199420
Mohr qualifies for U.S. Olympic track and field trials /news/2024/06/17/mohr-olympic-track-and-field-trials/ Tue, 18 Jun 2024 00:14:01 +0000 /news/?p=199421 UH ԴDz discus thrower Hallee Mohr will compete at the U.S. Olympic track and field trials.

The post Mohr qualifies for U.S. Olympic track and field trials first appeared on University of 51׻ʻi System News.]]>
Reading time: < 1 minute

person throwing a discus in a large stadium

University of 51׻ʻi at ԴDz discus thrower Hallee Mohr continues her incredible outdoor season after earning a spot in the U.S. Olympic track and field trials at Hayward Field in Eugene, Oregon.

The discus is scheduled for June 24 at 2 p.m. (HST) and will be broadcast live on NBC. Mohr is one of 24 athletes in the field. The top three finishers will qualify for the 2024 Paris Olympics provided they meet the Olympic standard of 64.50m.

Mohr recently earned All-America honors with an 11th-place finish at the NCAA Championships, also held at Hayward Field on June 8. She posted a mark of 55.46m (181-11) to become just the fourth Rainbow Wahine discus thrower to earn All-America recognition. Mohr is the first UH athlete since Amber Kaufman in 2008 (high jump) to compete in the U.S. Olympic track and field trial.

The post Mohr qualifies for U.S. Olympic track and field trials first appeared on University of 51׻ʻi System News.]]>
199421
ʻUluʻulu joins national project to preserve historic public TV programs /news/2024/06/17/uluulu-national-project-preserve-historic-public-tv/ Mon, 17 Jun 2024 22:21:55 +0000 /news/?p=199411 PBS 51׻ʻi collection to become part of national archive through ʻUluʻulu.

The post ʻUluʻulu joins national project to preserve historic public TV programs first appeared on University of 51׻ʻi System News.]]>
Reading time: 2 minutes

Betacam tapes from the P B S 51׻i archive

at the University of 51׻ʻi–West Oʻahu is part of a nationwide effort to digitize and preserve historic publicly funded radio and television programs across America, including .

The project, (AAPB), is a collaboration between the , and participating organizations across the country who care for archival public media.

“I’m so proud that the programs from PBS 51׻ʻi archived at ʻUluʻulu will soon be available to watch online through the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website,” said Janel Quirante, ʻUluʻulu head archivist. “The footage will be in good company with other public media icons like Julia Child and Mr. Rogers!”

ʻUluʻulu, 51׻ʻi’s official state archive for moving images, is coordinating the digitization and description of 2,000 films and videotapes from the PBS 51׻ʻi collection. The entire digitization project is expected to be completed by the end of the year.

The digitized programs will be made publicly available through ʻUluʻulu‘s online catalog and the AAPB website. The digital preservation masters will be stored at ʻUluʻulu and at the Library of Congress.

“We are in the business of preserving analog media—ensuring that these films and videotapes are carefully maintained, digitized, and made accessible to the public,” said ʻUluʻulu Collections Specialist and Producer Heather H. Giugni. “It is partnerships and opportunities like these that make our mission possible.”

ʻUluʻulu received the PBS 51׻ʻi collection in 2016, and the tapes are physically stored in a vault on campus. Over the years, ʻUluʻulu has been able to digitize portions of this collection through various grant funding. The new project will enable the digitization of the remaining videotapes, with the help of WGBH and a preservation laboratory in Pennsylvania.

Read more at .
—by Zenaida Serrano Arvman

The post ʻUluʻulu joins national project to preserve historic public TV programs first appeared on University of 51׻ʻi System News.]]>
199411
Free new limu culture classes at Windward CC /news/2024/06/17/limu-culture-classes-windward-cc/ Mon, 17 Jun 2024 20:59:11 +0000 /news/?p=199403 A new limu culture pathway at Windward CC includes traditional 51׻ian knowledge.

The post Free new limu culture classes at Windward CC first appeared on University of 51׻ʻi System News.]]>
Reading time: 2 minutes
Limu on a hand
(Photo courtesy of UH 51׻ʻi Sea Grant)

Windward Community College has launched a free, limu (seaweed) culture pathway combining traditional Native 51׻ian knowledge with Western scientific methods, with classes beginning in the fall. The new prepares students for emerging algal-based career opportunities in agricultural biotechnology, pharmacognosy, agribusiness entrepreneurship and plant-based manufacturing.

Two people wading in the water holding buckets
Collecting limu at the Waikalua Loko Iʻa

“These classes are a wonderful opportunity for students and community members to learn more about the importance of limu in 51׻ʻi. For those thinking about a career in agriculture or biomanufacturing, these classes are a great place to start,” said Jolie Dollar, Limu Center coordinator and instructor. “Our partnership with the Waikalua Loko fishpond, where limu is already being grown, is a bonus for students wanting coursework that combines 51׻ian traditional knowledge, ecological sustainability and food production.”

The limu culture track, which can be completed in two to three semesters, enables students to conduct research on critical limu-related topics, enhancing their knowledge of limu ecology and production. Students can also enroll in the , and earn credits that can be used for advancement to the limu culture CA.

Thanks to grants from the (TCUP) and Carl D. Perkins Strengthening Career and Technical Education, all classes within the limu culture CA program will be tuition-free. A tuition waiver will be automatically applied once students register for the limu culture classes. Students must apply to Windward CC and receive an acceptance email before registering.

The U.S. is experiencing a growing demand for skilled algae workers, with more than 11,500 projected jobs nationally, offering salaries exceeding $40,000 annually, according to an Algae Technology Education Consortium survey. 51׻ʻi‘s unique environment makes it a prime location for algae-related employment, with around 5,000 job opportunities in algae cultivation, harvesting and processing, and another 5,000 positions in algal biomanufacturing and fermentation.

For more details about the Limu Culture pathway, contact Dollar at (808) 236-9245 or jolied@hawaii.edu.

Round structures of algae
Algae under the microscope
The post Free new limu culture classes at Windward CC first appeared on University of 51׻ʻi System News.]]>
199403
Walter Dods, Jr., Jay H. Shidler, donate Akaji sculpture to UH ԴDz’s RISE /news/2024/06/15/akaji-sculpture-dedication-rise-grand-opening/ Sat, 15 Jun 2024 22:40:54 +0000 /news/?p=199377 RISE was built under a public-private partnership between UH, UH Foundation and Hunt Companies 51׻ʻi.

The post Walter Dods, Jr., Jay H. Shidler, donate Akaji sculpture to UH ԴDz’s RISE first appeared on University of 51׻ʻi System News.]]>
Reading time: 2 minutes

University of 51׻ʻi at ԴDz alumni Walter Dods, Jr. and Jay H. Shidler have gifted a sculpture by the late Bumpei Akaji to their alma mater. The sculpture, “RISE,” was installed outside the Walter Dods, Jr. RISE Center, and dedicated in a special ceremony prior to the official grand opening of the center on June 15.

large sculpture

The sculpture “RISE” was created in 1979 by Kauaʻi-born artist Bumpei Akaji as a gift for the late Masaru “Pundy” Yokouchi, founding chairperson of 51׻ʻi’s State Foundation on Culture and the Arts. Dods and Shidler purchased the sculpture from Yokouchi’s estate on Maui. Dods named it “RISE” with permission from Yokouchi’s family.

“I thought it’d be cool to name it RISE, and bringing it back to Metcalf Street is just incredible,” Dods said.

Akaji was one of seven local artists who attended UH ԴDz after World War II and lived at the “Metcalf Chateau,” an old house they rented in the 1950s on Metcalf Street, a short distance away from the RISE Center. Akaji, who was a member of the famed 442nd Regimental Combat Team during the war, stayed in Italy to study painting and sculpture before returning to attend UH and became one of the first to earn a master’s in fine arts degree from UH ԴDz in 1952.

RISE grand opening

people sitting in a large room

The RISE building was named for Dods in honor of his gift of $5 million, which supports the RISE programs operated by the (PACE) at the UH ԴDz . The student entrepreneurship and innovation center with housing for 374 students opened in August 2023.

RISE was built under a public-private partnership between UH, and Hunt Companies 51׻ʻi. UH Foundation recently moved its headquarters to the second and third floors of the Charles Atherton House at RISE.

“This project is such a powerful example of what can happen when we innovate in our thinking and embrace creative partnerships to re-imagine our state’s future,” said Gov. Josh Green, MD. “These projects serve as an example that there is a way to improve facilities without relying solely on taxpayer dollars, and in UH’s case, tuition monies.”

“We are proud that UH Foundation is a partner in this groundbreaking project that will nurture and inspire generations of student entrepreneurs,” said UH Foundation CEO Tim Dolan. “We’re excited we get to work here in this historic building and grateful we get to admire this wonderful gift from Walter and Jay, the sculpture by Bumpei Akaji, every day.”

PACE Board Chair Susan Yamada noted that her first trip to the University of Utah’s Lassonde Studios, which served as the model for RISE, was just seven years ago. The groundbreaking was in January 2022 and the building was completed in August 2023.

Related UH News stories:

“The journey to this grand opening was very challenging,” Yamada said. “Overcoming adversity by working as a team and persevering are traits we want our students to acquire while studying at UH.”

In addition to gifting the RISE sculpture to UH, Dods brought it from Maui to ԴDz with help from Matson, Royal Contracting and Island Movers, each of which donated their services.

Artist and consultant Kelly Sueda oversaw a restoration of the sculpture to its original glory, as well as the installation.

people standing in front of a large sculpture

The post Walter Dods, Jr., Jay H. Shidler, donate Akaji sculpture to UH ԴDz’s RISE first appeared on University of 51׻ʻi System News.]]>
199377
English professor showcases Fanny Fern, America’s first feminist satirist /news/2024/06/14/fanny-fern-americas-first-feminist-satirist/ Sat, 15 Jun 2024 02:38:28 +0000 /news/?p=199368 James Caron published a book about America’s highest-paid woman columnist, who captivated readers in the 19th century.

The post English professor showcases Fanny Fern, America’s first feminist satirist first appeared on University of 51׻ʻi System News.]]>
Reading time: 2 minutes
Black and white image of Sara Parton and book cover
From left: Sara Parton also known as Fanny Fern, right: Caron’s son Will, a UH ԴDz alumnus, created the illustration on the book cover

Digging into 19th-century newspaper archives, James Caron, professor emeritus from the University of 51׻ʻi at Mānoa’s , recovered a literary treasure trove: the weekly columns of Sara Parton, known as “Fanny Fern,” who became America’s most highly-paid woman columnist. From the 1850s to the 1870s, Parton captivated readers with her keen insights and satirical takes on social issues, especially domestic life and gender expectations.

“She’s fearless, she’s absolutely fearless,” explained Caron. “She could be very sharp, even aggressive, with her wit. Some people at first thought that she was a man.”

For example, she has this to say about a proper woman:

  • I’m not speaking of those doll-baby libels upon womanhood, whose chief ambition is to be walking advertisements for the dressmaker; but a rational, refined, sensible woman, who knows how to look like a lady upon small means.”

Caron, fascinated by Fern’s clever wordplay, delved deep into her early newspaper writings and unpublished works. He recently published The Modern Feminine in the Medusa Satire of Fanny Fern (2024), which celebrates Fern as a foundational figure in a lineage of feminist satirists.

During his 36-year tenure at UH Mānoa, Caron often incorporated Parton’s writings into his courses on American humor.

Everybody laughs

Caron, a passionate fan of satirical literature, draws inspiration from literary giants like Mark Twain, who used satire to humorously critique society.

“I started with an interest in folk stories and tall tales before the Civil War, then Mark Twain, and then any funny things that people wrote,” Caron explained. “Because everybody all around the world, everybody laughs. All cultures tell stories that make people laugh; it’s very, very human.”

He has authored previous books exploring satire’s role in shaping public discourse: Satire as the Comic Public Sphere: Postmodern ‘Truthiness’ and Civic Engagement (2021) and Mark Twain, Unsanctified Newspaper Reporter (2008).

“Satire has a long-standing effort, all the way back to the Greeks and the Romans, to try to make the public sphere a better place,” Caron said.

can be found at the and on .

The post English professor showcases Fanny Fern, America’s first feminist satirist first appeared on University of 51׻ʻi System News.]]>
199368
Pelehonuamea Harman: Charting UH ᾱ’s course in Indigenous learning /news/2024/06/14/harman-charting-indigenous-learning/ Sat, 15 Jun 2024 01:43:45 +0000 /news/?p=199351 Harman is scheduled to begin on July 1, 2024.

The post Pelehonuamea Harman: Charting UH ᾱ’s course in Indigenous learning first appeared on University of 51׻ʻi System News.]]>
Reading time: 2 minutes
portrait of Pelehonuamea Harman
Pelehonuamea Harman (Photo Credit: Daniella Zalcman)

51׻ʻi Island educator Pelehonuamea Harman has been appointed as the first-ever director of Native 51׻ian Engagement at the . The announcement, confirmed by the UH Board of Regents and UH President David Lassner this June, marks a significant stride toward the university’s goal of becoming a leader in Indigenous education. Harman is scheduled to start in her new role on July 1.

Harman will join the growing 51׻ʻi Papa o Ke Ao team established throughout the 10-campus UH System to develop, implement and assess strategic actions to enhance the higher education needs of Native 51׻ians. At UH Hilo, Harman will help to implement priorities such as advancing language and culture parity in areas ranging from programming and curriculum to research and hiring practices.

“Her acceptance of this role and her willingness to share her rich lineage of 51׻ian language and cultural knowledge as a moʻopuna kuakahi (great-granddaughter) of Mary Kawena Pukui, one of the University of Ჹɲʻ’s most esteemed scholars of 51׻ian knowledge, is a testament to her commitment to our shared journey of reclaiming this ʻike (knowledge) in our endeavors moving forward as a university,” said UH Hilo Chancellor Bonnie D. Irwin.

Wealth of knowledge, expertise

Harman brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise to the position, with more than twenty years of experience in 51׻ian immersion education, which includes teaching at UH ᾱ’s Nāwahīokalaniʻōpuʻu K–12 laboratory school and the program within .

Harman is an alumna of UH Hilo with a bachelor of arts in 51׻ian studies, a teaching certificate from Kahuawaiola, and a master of arts in 51׻ian language and literature.

ʻŌiwi (Native 51׻ian) innovators

Together with her husband, Kekoa, an associate professor of 51׻ian studies and 51׻ian language at UH Hilo, Pelehonuamea serves as a kumu hula (hula teacher) of Hālau I Ka Leo Ola O Nā Mamo (Hālau of the Living Voice of Descendants).

Related: From hula to PhD: UH Hilo kumu shares ʻōlelo 51׻ʻi journey, March 28, 2024

Harman is a haumāna ʻuniki (student of intense studies) of Kumu Hula Kimo Alama Keaulana. The Harmans’ hālau hula (hula school) based on 51׻ʻi Mokupuni (51׻ʻi Island), is focused on raising new generations grounded in the practices of hula from a strong foundation of 51׻ian language fluency. Living what they teach, they raise all four of their children through ʻōlelo 51׻ʻi (51׻ian language).

In a notable recognition of their expertise, the Harmans were invited to Kennedy Center in Washington D.C. in 2022 to collaborate on curriculum development for their haumāna (students).

For more go to .

By Susan Enright

The post Pelehonuamea Harman: Charting UH ᾱ’s course in Indigenous learning first appeared on University of 51׻ʻi System News.]]>
199351